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MEF produces several kinds of white papers:

Business and Positioning Papers describe the application and use of Carrier Ethernet Services and their impact on service providers, their partners and customers.

Technical Papers explain the definitions and attributes of MEF technical specifications and implementation agreements.

Best Practices Papers provide guidance and choices on the implementation of Carrier Ethernet Services and Management standards together with the impact of those choices.

These MEF papers are produced by the MEF Marketing Committee following formal development and approval processes.

 

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As society continues to evolve into a pervasive, interconnection of people, devices and content, networks become an important part of this new world. While the Internet has proven to be the global fabric that interconnects all things, networks need to provide more value than simply raw bandwidth. As networks globally transform themselves into an on-demand andreal-time set of programmable systems, many applications are moving to the cloud as an IT utility for a globalized and mobile workforce. While the advancements of Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Carrier Ethernet (CE) have proven to delivera business grade private Wide Area Network (WAN) for enterprises worldwide, challenges persist. The time it takes to bring up new sites and interconnecting sites or public or private clouds has increasingly become an issue. Today it can take many months to enable a multi-national business to connect various sites globally to each other or to their public and private clouds.  Additionally, services changes, even just bandwidthchanges, can often take weeks because they involve manual workflow-based processes that are unacceptable for a society now accustomed to on-demand cloud-based applications and services. Software-Defined WANs (SDWANs) have emerged as one such solution to address these issues.

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This paper describes an industry vision for the evolution and transformation of network connectivity services and the networks used to deliver them. The MEF refers to this vision as the “Third Network” where the Third Network combines the on-demand agility and ubiquity of the Internet with the performance and security assurances of today’s business grade networks (i.e.: Carrier Ethernet 2.0 and MPLS).

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The MEF introduced the MEF 48 (Service Activation Testing [SAT]) along with MEF 46 (Latching Loopback), and MEF 49 (SAT Control Protocol and PDU Formats) as a framework to help service providers with a new standardized approach to testing and troubleshooting Carrier Ethernet-based services. Collectively these standards are known as the MEF SAT Power Play. This white paper describes the portfolio of the SAT Power Play, how each element can be used either individually or collectively, and can be an indispensable resource to a service provider.

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This paper together with its companion paper, “Part II: How to Measure Carrier Ethernet Performance Attributes”, provides an in-depth guide to performance monitoring and assurance across the body of work of the MEF enabling the reader an accessible, one-stop guide to understanding CE 2.0 performance monitoring best practices and use them to their full advantage.

Part II focuses on the practical considerations and methods for measuring Carrier Ethernet service performance. The reader will benefit from understanding how to measure the service quality of Carrier Ethernet services based on MEF standards. There exists significant confusion with respect to performance management best practices for Carrier Ethernet services. This confusion is the result of multiple transport technologies, legacy tools, proprietary instrumentation, interoperability challenges as well as other related service assurance standards. These factors conspire to make it difficult to understand and leverage the best practices available. Having the performance-oriented service assurance elements which are specified in over a dozen MEF technical specifications centralized and accessible to the reader enables a more efficient and rapid implementation of these best practices for Carrier Ethernet 2.0 service assurance.

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This paper together with its companion paper, “Part I: An Introduction to Service Assurance and Carrier Ethernet Service Performance Attributes”, provides an in-depth guide to performance monitoring and assurance across the body of work of the MEF enabling the reader an accessible, one-stop guide to understanding CE 2.0 performance monitoring best practices and use them to their full advantage.

Part II focuses on the practical considerations and methods for measuring Carrier Ethernet service performance. The reader will benefit from understanding how to measure the service quality of Carrier Ethernet services based on MEF standards. There exists significant confusion with respect to performance management best practices for Carrier Ethernet services. This confusion is the result of multiple transport technologies, legacy tools, proprietary instrumentation, interoperability challenges as well as other related service assurance standards. These factors conspire to make it difficult to understand and leverage the best practices available. Having the performance-oriented service assurance elements which are specified in over a dozen MEF technical specifications centralized and accessible to the reader enables a more efficient and rapid implementation of these best practices for Carrier Ethernet 2.0 service assurance.

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This paper explores the role of NFV in conjunction with delivering CE 2.0 services. The paper discusses options for introducing and implementing NFV to add new virtual network functions and services onto foundational Carrier Ethernet (CE) connectivity services including use cases for different delivery models for virtual network services at the customer premises or remotely from the service provider’s network.

The paper also discusses virtualization approaches for service demarcation equipment, e.g., Network Interface Devices (NIDs), at the customer premise for different network functions and services.

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This revised collaboration between Small Cell Forum and MEF details backhaul for small cells deployed in an urban scenario.

It helps operators, backhaul and service providers to understand the particular needs of urban small cells from a backhaul perspective. The document summarizes key aspects that must be considered when designing and deploying the transport network and points to sources of further information. A recent SCF survey showed that backhaul was perceived as one of the main barriers to urban small cell deployment. The paper provides both technical and financial analysis which shows that feasible and cost effective solutions are available to address their concerns. The paper shows backhaul performance requirements vary depending on operator implementation and highlights the use of Carrier Ethernet Backhaul.

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(links to SCF)

This latest collaboration between Small Cell Forum and MEF demonstrate that small cell technologies are coming of age thanks to scaling of deployments in residential, enterprise and now urban markets.

These maturing technologies can now be applied to a range of rural and remote use cases that may not otherwise be viable using traditional deployment approaches. Small cells are well suited to deployment in rural villages, remote industrial sites, on transportation, and for temporary networks. This paper helps operators, backhaul and service providers to understand the particular needs of rural and remote small cells from a backhaul perspective. It summarizes key aspects that must be considered when designing and deploying the transport network, and points to sources of further information.

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(links to SCF)

Bandwidth profiles used in MEF 6.2, “Ethernet Services Definitions – Phase 3”, have significantly changed compared to those used in MEF 6.1, “Ethernet Services Definitions – Phase 2”...

Some significant changes in MEF 6.2 include:

  • The bandwidth profile algorithm is generalized to support more than one flow with token sharing
    (prioritized bandwidth sharing) among flows.
  • Per-UNI and per-EVC bandwidth profiles are no longer used.
  • At egress, per-CoS ID bandwidth profiles are replaced by per-EEC ID bandwidth profiles.

This paper explains MEF 6.2 bandwidth profiles in relation to MEF 6.1 bandwidth profiles. It discusses backward compatibility, explains expanded capabilities, and offers some insight into using them.

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This paper defines the MEF's vision for Lifecycle Service Orchestration (LSO) and describes the essential LSO and management capabilities necessary to achieve the goal of the Third Network to deliver network as a service...

The goal of LSO is to define service abstractions that hide the complexity of underlying network technologies and layers from the applications and users of the services.  The LSO vision will drive functional requirements and APIs that support capabilities for fulfillment, control, performance, assurance, usage, security, analytics, and policy across multi-operator networks.

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La Tercera Red: Visión de la Lifecycle Service Orchestration
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A Terceira Rede: Visão de Lifecycle Service Orchestration
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MEF’s vision is based on network as a service principles which make the network appear as a user’s own virtual network....

This enables the user to dynamically and on-demand, create, modify and delete services via customer web portals or software applications. This is analogous to cloud-based services, such as infrastructure as a service (IaaS), where users can dynamically create, modify or delete compute and storage resources. MEF will achieve this vision by building upon its successful CE 2.0 foundation by defining requirements for Lifecycle Service Orchestration (LSO) and APIs for service ordering, fulfillment, performance, usage, analytics and security across multi-operator networks. This approach overcomes existing constraints by defining service abstractions that hide the complexity of underlying technologies and network layers from the applications and users of the services. The goal of the Third Network, based on network as a service principles, is to enable agile networks that deliver assured connectivity services orchestrated across network domains between physical or virtual service endpoints.

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La Tercera Red: Visión y estrategia
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A Terceira Rede: Visão e Estratégia
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This paper examines how Carrier Ethernet fits together with Software-Defined Networking (SDN). It describes SDN, then looks at how SDN can be applied as a vehicle for delivering Carrier Ethernet ...

The result is that SDN makes Carrier Ethernet more dynamic and agile. This more dynamic Carrier Ethernet is well-suited for on-demand cloud applications and interconnecting virtual network functions and their cloud computing infrastructure.

In this paper, the working definitions of SDN and models for Carrier Ethernet (CE) and SDN are described. Evolving CE service deployments which provide the benefits of SDN based management and responsiveness are also discussed.

A companion paper "Carrier Ethernet and SDN Part 2: Practical Considerations" is available below.

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This paper discusses the architectural models of Carrier Ethernet and SDN, the practical considerations of SDN and Carrier Ethernet for operational support systems. ...

It also addresses the mechanisms Carrier Ethernet offers SDN and describes several application scenarios for the combined use of Carrier Ethernet and SDN, including discussions of services and management. The paper examines Carrier Ethernet and how Carrier Ethernet applies in a world where Software-Defined Networking (SDN) is emerging.

A companion paper "Carrier Ethernet and SDN Part 1: An Industry Perspective" is available, above.

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This paper helps service providers understand the value and extend the use of the latest CE 2.0 Management concepts ...

for Ethernet-based Services so as to meet efficiency visibility and customer satisfaction goals. The paper brings awareness of the Life Cycle of a CE 2.0 service from an MEF Service Management perspective. MEF introduced the Carrier Ethernet 2.0 (CE 2.0) generation framework to help service providers with a new standardized approach to delivering Carrier Ethernet-based services. It discusses how the new functionality improves the day-to-day operations of service providers and how the MEF specifications and implementation agreements are leveraged to deliver services and provide operational efficiencies that can be translated into OPEX savings.

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This paper is the result of a collaboration between Small Cell Forum and MEF, working together to accelerate the adoption of carrier grade backhaul and synchronization for small cells.

As LTE and LTE-Advanced are deployed in place of or along side 2G and 3G technologies, there are additional requirements on synchronization, including the wider need for very tight time synchronization. This paper describes these new requirements and the technologies available to fulfill those needs.

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This paper provides a technical overview of the MEF CE 2.0 E-Access services standard, with implementation guidelines and sample

use cases. It discusses the benefits that can be expected when adopting this global standard that makes it simpler and faster for service providers to interconnect and meet the growing demand at locations outside of a service provider’s own network. The paper is primarily intended for retail service providers and wholesale access providers looking for a single well-accepted industry-standard approach instead of many different existing or future ad-hoc arrangements.

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This MEF Best Practices document describes ways for the Backhaul Provider to optimize the use of Mobile Backhaul bandwidth

resulting in considerable cost savings as well as improving application-specific quality of service. The paper describes both Single CoS and Multi-CoS Wireless backhaul use cases. It provides 16 implementation recommendations for Multi-CoS mobile backhaul together with the rationale and implications of those choices in various scenarios. The paper also addresses the top challenges that Mobile Operators and Backhaul Providers face in moving to Multi-CoS Wireless Backhaul.

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The enterprise Information and Communications Technology landscape is constantly changing. New IP based voice and video services,

continue to add pressure on the WAN to deliver increased bandwidth and enhanced performance. On the WAN front, legacy technologies such as FR and ATM are being grand fathered by many service providers. TDM based connectivity such as DSn and OCn do not provide the operation flexibility expected by the modern enterprise. As ICT managers look for solutions, MEF defined, Carrier Ethernet services have emerged as an attractive alternative to provide those enterprises with a best of breed cost effective solution. The goal of this MEF positioning paper is to help enterprise decision makers better understand the role that Carrier Ethernet services can play in a business environment.

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This paper introduces the concept of delivering private cloud services via Carrier Ethernet wide area networks and services.

Its intention is to educate and initiate a dialog between the cloud industry’s stakeholders (enterprise users, cloud service providers, standards development organizations and cloud forums). The paper discusses the reasons why this is an important and beneficial development for stakeholders: generating new revenue opportunities while overcoming the many well-documented issues related to cloud service delivery to the Enterprise via the Internet. This is the first deliverable of the MEF’s very active Cloud Project that includes expansion of CE 2.0 Ethernet service attributes to embrace the dynamic, on-demand nature of cloud services.

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Mobile Backhaul refers to the network between Base Station sites and Network Controller/Gateway sites for all generations

of Mobile Technologies. This document is based upon the MEF 22.x Mobile Backhaul Implementation Agreement Technical Specification, which identifies the requirements for MEF Carrier Ethernet Services and MEF External Interfaces for use in Mobile Backhaul networks. Where possible, it specifies frequency and phase synchronization requirements for packet based synchronization methods and ITU-T Synchronous Ethernet (SyncE).

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Historically, Mobile Operators obtained connectivity between their Cell Sites and their on-net Aggregation sites primarily

by leasing TDM circuits from third party Access Providers. Increasingly, Carrier Ethernet is the target solution for mobile backhaul with the Mobile Operator leasing Ethernet Virtual Connections from the Access Provider. Today, in the vast majority of cases, these EVCs are running a single Class of Service. While the use of Single-CoS EVCs is a way to get started, MEF believes that the use of Multi-CoS EVCs for mobile backhaul is a much superior practice. This paper compares Single CoS backhaul to Multi-CoS backhaul, concluding that. Multi-CoS mobile backhaul results in substantial cost savings and that this lower cost Multi-CoS solution will result in equivalent or better quality than the Single-CoS solution.

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Customers increasingly demand more bandwidth and better service quality to meet their application needs.

Carrier Ethernet services are frequently the best selection to meet these requirements. This white paper provides an overview of how modern Microwave technology provides an efficient complement to copper and fiber in the access network.

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Globalization, virtualization, and mobile computing drive a seemingly insatiable demand for bandwidth, and only Carrier

Ethernet efficiently scales up to meet this demand. Customers seeking high performance business Ethernet services can now easily purchase faster Ethernet connections at 10 Mbit/s to 1 Gbit/s and beyond. But sometimes users believe they are receiving lower throughput than they expected. This MEF white paper presents an overview of the more common factors affecting Carrier Ethernet throughput, provides some pointers for getting more performance from higher layer protocols, and shows how to measure bandwidth throughput of a Carrier Ethernet service.

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Implementing Standardized Ethernet Interconnects for Carrier Ethernet Services. The goal of this document is to outline the

activities needed for Service Providers to implement the interconnection of autonomous Carrier Ethernet networks to enable standardized and streamlined delivery of MEF-certified Carrier Ethernet services with global end-to-end Class of Service, management and protection. Readers are introduced to the various implementation phases of Qualifying, Contracting, Ordering, Provisioning, Billing, and Assuring for Ethernet interconnections. Guidelines are provided to assist parties implementing the Ethernet interconnect at each phase.

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This well-known white paper provides a comprehensive technical overview of Ethernet services, based on the work of the

MEF Technical Committee. The paper is intended to help buyers and users of Ethernet services understand the various types and characteristics of Ethernet services, and to help service providers clearly communicate their service capabilities.

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This paper provides an introduction to the various applications considered to be most dominant and fastest growing in the

access networks. It also discusses the benefits of various access technologies available to support service providers offering an Ethernet service, as well as to subscribers to those services.

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This paper provides an introduction to Circuit Emulation Services over Ethernet (CESoE) enabling the support of synchronous

services such as T1/E1 over an asynchronous Ethernet infrastructure. The paper discusses the benefits of CESoE to service providers offering Ethernet access services, as well as to subscribers to those services in various applications. Finally, the paper discusses the current activities of MEF in standardizing and promoting CESoE.

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This paper provides a comprehensive technical overview of bandwidth profiles for Ethernet services, based on the work of the

MEF Technical Committee. The paper is intended to help buyers, users, providers of Ethernet services and equipment/semiconductor vendors understand the various types, characteristics and usage of bandwidth profiles as defined by MEF.

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